Community Indicators for Your Community

Real, lasting community change is built around knowing where you are, where you want to be, and whether your efforts are making a difference. Indicators are a necessary ingredient for sustainable change. And the process of selecting community indicators -- who chooses, how they choose, what they choose -- is as important as the data you select.

The Jacksonville Community Council (JCCI) understands indicators and community change, with more than 25 years of producing the annual Quality of Life Progress Report for Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida region, and two decades of helping other communities develop their own sustainable indicators projects. JCCI consultants give you the information you need to measure progress, identify priorities for action, and assess results.

I'd like to talk with you personally about how we can help. E-mail me at
ben@jcci.org, call (904) 396-3052, or visit CommunityWorks for more information. From San Antonio to Siberia, we're ready and willing to assist.


Tuesday, January 13, 2009

JCCI Releases Race Relations Progress Report

The Jacksonville Community Inc. (JCCI) has just released its fourth annual Race Relations Progress Report, measuring indicators of racial disparity throughout the Jacksonville community.

The report, which can be found here, contains indicators of perceptions of racism and discrimination, as well as measures of existing disparities and their trend in education, employment and income, neighborhoods and housing, health care access and outcomes, justice and the legal system, and in the political process and civic engagement.

The report is informed by a 50-question survey, conducted immediately following the 2008 Presidential election, of 1500 Jacksonville residents, including 400 white, 400 black, and 200 Hispanic residents. The full survey instrument and data set, along with separate cross-tab information for each racial and ethnic group, is available here.

The report was released at the community's annual Martin Luther King Jr. breakfast to an attendance of approximately 1,800 civic leaders. Reactions to the report, which included the progress made in reducing racial disparities, the areas of priority for further action, and the increasingly diverse population of Jacksonville, were significant. Also speaking at the breakfast was Mae Jemison, the first black woman in space.

News coverage included the following:

MSNBC: Annual Report Still Finds Racial Disparities in Education, Income
Latino Business Review: Study: Blacks, Hispanics Treated Disparately on Loans
Fox 30 News: City Releases Race Relations Report (view telecast online or read transcript)
Jacksonville Business Journal: Race Relations Report Cites Disparities
First Coast News: Businesses see Jacksonville's International Face
The Florida Times-Union: JCCI Report: Education Gains, But Race Relations Still an Issue
First Coast News: Race Relations Study Shows More Work Remains
The Florida Times-Union: Q&A with First Black Woman in Space

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